Books Read 2017

  1. The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI's Manufactured War on Terrorism by Trevor Aaronson
  2. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight by Unknown, Simon Armitage (Translator)
  3. Transformers: Robots in Disguise, Volume 1 by John Barber
  4. Transformers: Robots in Disguise, Volume 2 by John Barber
  5. Transformers: Robots in Disguise, Volume 3 by John Barber
  6. Transformers: Robots in Disguise, Volume 4 by John Barber
  7. Transformers: Robots In Disguise Volume 5 by John Barber
  8. Transformers: Robots in Disguise Volume 6 by John Barber
  9. Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman by Harold Bloom
  10. The Black Elfstone (The Fall of Shannara, #1) by Terry Brooks
  11. Enter Naomi: SST, L.A. and All That... by Joe Carducci
  12. The Nonexistent Knight by Italo Calvino
  13. The Awakening and Selected Stories by Kate Chopin
  14. 24/7: Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep by Jonathan Crary
  15. Why I Am Not a Feminist: A Feminist Manifesto by Jessa Crispin
  16. Captain Marvel (Marvel NOW!) #1 by Kelly Sue DeConnick
  17. The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick
  18. Daniel Deronda by George Eliot
  19. Star Trek: Harlan Ellison's The City on the Edge of Forever: The Original Teleplay by Harlan Ellison
  20. The Communist Manifesto: A Modern Edition by Friedrich Engels
  21. Farber on Film: The Complete Film Writings by Manny Farber
  22. Essays, Speeches & Public Letters by William Faulkner
  23. The 4-Hour Chef: The Simple Path to Cooking Like a Pro, Learning Anything, and Living the Good Life by Tim Ferriss
  24. When Prophecy Fails: A Social and Psychological Study of a Modern Group that Predicted the Destruction of the World by Leon Festinger
  25. Clinton in Haiti: The 1994 US Invasion of Haiti by Philippe Girard
  26. Burning Britain: The History of UK Punk 1980-1984 by Ian Glasper
  27. The Sorrows of Young Werther by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  28. A Philosophy of Tragedy by Christopher Hamilton
  29. Console Wars: Sega, Nintendo, and the Battle that Defined a Generation by Blake J. Harris
  30. A People's History of the French Revolution by Eric Hazan
  31. Film After Film: (Or, What Became of 21st Century Cinema?) by J. Hoberman
  32. Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King's Last Campaign by Michael K. Honey
  33. Reel to Real: Race, Sex, and Class at the Movies by bell hooks
  34. An Enemy of the People by Henrik Ibsen
  35. We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
  36. Perpetual Peace and Other Essays by Immanuel Kant
  37. The Future is Queer: A Science Fiction Anthology by Richard Labonté
  38. Engaging the Past: Mass Culture and the Production of Historical Knowledge by Alison Landsberg
  39. The Complete Fiction of Nella Larsen: Passing, Quicksand, and the Stories by Nella Larsen
  40. Wellsprings by Mario Vargas Llosa
  41. Identity Crisis by Brad Meltzer
  42. My Damage: The Story of a Punk Rock Survivor by Keith Morris
  43. Choosing Death: The Improbable History of Death Metal and Grindcore by Albert Mudrian
  44. A Year at the Movies: One Man's Filmgoing Odyssey by Kevin Murphy
  45. Kill All Normies: Online Culture Wars from 4chan and Tumblr to Trump and the Alt-Right by Angela Nagle
  46. Employee of the Month and Other Big Deals by Mary Jo Pehl
  47. Visual Storytellling: An Illustrated Reader by Todd James Pierce
  48. Why Be Something That You're Not: Detroit Hardcore 1979-1985 by Tony Rettman
  49. Clarissa, or, the History of a Young Lady by Samuel Richardson
  50. Green Gone Wrong: How Our Economy Is Undermining the Environmental Revolution by Heather Rogers
  51. Get In The Van: On The Road With Black Flag (Second Edition) by Henry Rollins
  52. American Isis: The Life and Art of Sylvia Plath by Carl Rollyson
  53. Lazarus, Vol. 1: Family by Greg Rucka
  54. Der Mond: The Art of Neon Genesis Evangelion by Yoshiyuki Sadamoto
  55. Settlers: The Mythology of the White Proletariat by J. Sakai
  56. A New Companion to Digital Humanities by Susan Schreibman
  57. The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power by Jeff Sharlet
  58. Change Agent by Daniel Suarez
  59. Letters from the Earth: Uncensored Writings by Mark Twain
  60. Saga, Vol. 1 (Saga, #1) by Brian K. Vaughan
  61. Saga, Vol. 2 (Saga, #2) by Brian K. Vaughan
  62. A Brief History of Portable Literature by Enrique Vila-Matas
  63. Dublinesque by Enrique Vila-Matas
  64. Ms. Marvel, Vol. 1: No Normal by G. Willow Wilson
  65. Ms. Marvel, Vol. 2: Generation Why by G. Willow Wilson
  66. The History of the Renaissance World: From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Conquest of Constantinople by Susan Wise Bauer
  67. How Fiction Works by James Wood
  68. No Slam Dancing, No Stage Diving, No Spikes: An Oral History of the Legendary City Gardens by Amy Yates Wuelfing
  69. What's My Name, Fool? Sports and Resistance in the United States by Dave Zirin

Worth Reading

  1. Nina Illingworth on the homophobic "humor" of liberalism.
  2. Jeremy Parish's great series about Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past.
  3. Luke Savage on how liberals fell in love with the horrific show The West Wing.
  4. R.L. Stephens on Ta Nehisi Coates.
  5. Jessica Wilkerson on the Appalachia.
  6. Amber A'Lee Frost on current leftist protests.
  7. Anthony Pappalardo on the youth crew aesthetic.
  8. Jessa Crispin on identity and amnesia.
  9. Angela Nagle on The Handmaid's Tale.
  10. Miya Tokumitsu on the vast control employers have over the lives of employees.

What I Am UpTo Summer 2017

Summer classes begin the Monday after graduation, so my five week composition course is already half done. This summer I am teaching my normal assortment of composition courses plus CIN109 American Cinema and, for the first time, LIT203 Masterpieces of World Literature.

During the summer I do not have official office hours, but I am anxiously awaiting the completion of our new, permanent, offices in Laurel Hall. They will be done in time for the fall semester.

News about the 2017 version of THATCamp Community College will be coming nearer to the fall.

I am now chairing our honors initiative here at RCBC. I am really proud of the work we have done to get the first batch of courses off the ground and look forward to what comes next. I have some plans I would like to set in motion.

Otherwise I am hard at work on archival work and podcasting. I will have some posts up during the summer detailing some of my activities during the school year. Stay tuned.

Books Read In 2016

  1. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander
  2. A People's History of Christianity: The Other Side of the Story by Diana Butler Bass
  3. The History of the Ancient World: From the Earliest Accounts to the Fall of Rome by Susan Wise Bauer
  4. The History of the Medieval World: From the Conversion of Constantine to the First Crusade by Susan Wise Bauer
  5. Heavy Metal Music In Britain by Gerd Bayer
  6. The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy by Maggie Berg
  7. The Smart Girl's Guide to Privacy: Practical Tips for Staying Safe Online by Violet Blue
  8. Monsieur Pain by Roberto Bolano
  9. Nazi Literature In The Americas by Roberto Bolano
  10. The Unknown University by Roberto Bolano
  11. The Secret History of Science Fiction by T.C. Boyle
  12. The Sorcerer's Daughter: The Defenders of Shannara by Terry Brooks
  13. Letters, 1941-1985 by Italo Calvino
  14. Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Generation by Jeff Chang
  15. Lion's Pride: The Turbulent History of New Japan Pro Wrestling by Chris Charlton
  16. X-Men: Days Of Future Past by Chris Claremont
  17. Disgrace: A Novel by J.M. Coetzee
  18. Panther In The Hive by Olivia A. Cole
  19. Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous by Gabriella Coleman
  20. The Student Loan Scam: The Most Oppressive Debt in U.S. History and How We Can Fight Back by Alan Collinge
  21. Secret Identity Crisis: Comic Books and the Unmasking of Cold War America by Matthew J. Costello
  22. Captain Beefheart's Trout Mask Replica by Kevin Courrier
  23. Unfortunately, It Was Paradise: Selected Poems by Mahmoud Darwish
  24. Star Trek Archives: The Best Of Peter David
  25. Women In Class Struggle by Marlene Dixon
  26. Mystery Science Storybook: Bedtime Tales Based on the Worst Movies Ever by Sugar Ray Dodge
  27. The Life Engineered by JF Dubeau
  28. Husker Du: The Story Of The Noise-Pop Pioneers Who Launched Modern Rock by Andrew Earles
  29. On Literature by Umberto Eco
  30. Selected Essays, Poems, and Other Writings by George Eliot
  31. Picture Windows: How The Suburbs Happened by Elizabeth Ewen
  32. False Choices: The Faux Feminism Of Hilary Rodham Clinton by Liza Featherstone
  33. Welcome To Night Vale: A Novel by Joseph Fink
  34. The Minutemen's Double Nickels on the Dime by Michael Fournier
  35. Nirvana's In Utero by Gillian Gaar
  36. Batman: Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader? by Neil Gaiman
  37. The Game of Our Lives: The English Premier League and the Making of Modern Britain by David Goldblatt
  38. Imagine: Living In A Socialist USA by Frances Goldin
  39. Anxiety: A Short History by Allan V. Horwitz
  40. Queen Of Chaos: The Misadventures Of Hillary Clinton by Diana Johnstone
  41. The Walking Dead Volume One by Robert Kirkman
  42. The Walking Dead Volume Two by Robert Kirkman
  43. Capitalism: A Short History by Jurgen Kocka
  44. Flu: The Story Of The Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and the Search for the Virus that Caused It by Gina Kolata
  45. State & Revolution by Vladimir Lenin
  46. Daredevil: Born Again by Frank Miller
  47. Milton and the Post-Secular Present: Ethics, Politics, Terrorism by Feisal Mohamed
  48. All Star Superman by Grant Morrison
  49. Alice Munro's Best: Selected Stories by Alice Munro
  50. Batman & Green Arrow: The Poison Tomorrow by Dennis O'Neil
  51. The Simpsons: An Uncensored, Unauthorized, History by John Ortved
  52. Game Boy World: 1989: A History of Nintendo Game Boy, Volume One by Jeremy Parish
  53. The Apology by Plato
  54. The Reactionary Mind: Conservatism from Edmund Burke to Sarah Palin by Corey Rubin
  55. Islamic Science and the Making of the European Renaissance by Goerge Saliba
  56. The Assasination Complex: Inside The Government's Secret Drone Warface Program by Jeremy Scahill
  57. Batgirl 2012 Annual by Gail Simone
  58. Lumberjanes Volume One by Noelle Stevenson
  59. Lumberjanes Volume Two by Noelle Stevenson
  60. The ABCs Of Socialism by Bhaskar Sunkara
  61. The Legend of Zelda: Hyrule Historia by Patrick Thorpe
  62. The People: The Rise and Fall of the Working Class, 1910-2010 by Selina Todd
  63. The Monsters Of Education Technology by Audrey Watters
  64. Lumberjanes Volume Three by Shannon Watters
  65. Lumberjanes Volume Four by Shannon Watters
  66. Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism by Max Weber
  67. Race Matters by Cornell West
  68. Crisis On Infinite Earths by Marv Wolfman
  69. A Vindication Of The Rights Of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft

What I Am Up To Spring 2017

  • After a productive winter break, I am glad to be back teaching.
  • This semester I am teaching my normal assortment of composition courses, but also teaching our honors section of composition II again. I posted syllabi for it a few days ago. I am also teaching American Cinema again as well.
  • My spring office hours are all 1000-1100 on Tuesday-Friday
  • News about the 2017 version of THATCamp Community College will be coming soon. We soft launched a date, but it needs to be changed because RCBC is now closed on Friday during the summer. More information will be announced once the committee meets during the spring.
  • I sent proposals in for two upcoming conferences, but have not heard back about them yet.
  • Our honors college committee will meet a few times during the semester. More information about that will be coming soon hopefully.

ENG102HN Honors Composition II Spring 2017

Rowan College at Burlington County (RCBC)
Spring 2017
Liberal Arts

Code: English 102-306HN            Title: College Composition II Honors             Credits: 3

Instructor: William Patrick Wend

Meeting Days: Monday/Wednesday, Laurel 205

Email: wwend@rcbc.edu                      Phone: 856-222-9311 #1401         Texting: 609-488-4483*

Office Hours: Parker 413B T/TH Laurel Hall 110 W/F 1000-1100

Response Time: I am primarily in my email during office hours except for Wednesday when I do "EOffice" hours (2100-2200) on Skype. If you send an email after about 1600, there is a good chance I will not answer it until the next morning. I am rarely in my email during the weekend.

*Please let me know who you are and what class you are in somewhere in your first text.

 

SECTION 1: Course Information

Course Description:

This course in composition focuses on reading, analyzing, and discussing literature. It emphasizes reading skills, the expression of insights in writing, and the pleasures of reading literature.


Required Texts and other Materials:

  • Robert DiYanni, Literature: Approaches To Fiction, Poetry, and Drama, McGraw Hill, 978-0-07-312445-2 (This book is required immediately)


Course Learning Outcomes ~ By the end of English 102, you should be able to:

  • Discuss works of literature through extensive reading and discussion.

  • Analyze short stories for plot, setting, characterization, theme, and point of view.

  • Examine poetry for imagery, diction, tone, speaker, language, and structure.

  • Examine plays, focusing on character development, dramatic structure, and performance.

  • Write essays, using MLA-style documentation, analyzing works of short fiction, poetry, and drama.

 

General Education Outcomes:

Written and Oral Communication: Communication

  • Students will logically and persuasively support their points of view or findings.

  • Students will communicate meaningfully with a chosen audience while demonstrating critical thought.

  • Students will conduct investigative research which demonstrates academic integrity, originality, depth of thought, and mastery of an approved style of source documentation.

 

Quantitative Knowledge and Skills: Mathematics

  • Students will analyze data to solve problems utilizing appropriate mathematical concepts.

  • Students will translate quantifiable problems into mathematical terms and solve these problems using mathematical or statistical operations.

  • Students will logically solve problems using the appropriate mathematical technique.

 

Technological Competency or Information Literacy: Technology

  • Students will use critical thinking skills for computer-based access, analysis, and presentation of information.

  • Students will exhibit competency in library online database tools appropriate to accessing information in reference publications, periodicals and bibliographies.

  • Students will demonstrate the skills required to find, evaluate, and apply information to solve a problem.

 

Humanistic Perspective: Humanities LITERATURE:

  • Students will recognize and assess the contributions of people from various nations and/or cultures.

  • Students will analyze the changing significance of social constructions of religion, race, class, and/or gender in cultural artifacts (music, art, literature) throughout time.

 

Historical Perspective: History

  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of the nature, origins, central events and significant institutions of major civilizations

 

Global and Cultural Awareness: Diversity

  • Students will be able to compare and contrast cultural norms from diverse populations.

  • Students will be able to explain how communication and culture are interrelated.
     

Core Course Content:

  • Writing about and reading fiction, poetry, & drama – summary of the process and comprehension strategies

  • Language and literary techniques: precision and ambiguity, description, metaphor and simile, symbolism

  • Fiction: reading, responding, writing, the short story

  • Narration and point of view

  • Foreshadowing and irony Character and setting

  • Theme and plot chart

  • Poetry: reading, responding, writing, poetic forms: the sonnet, the dramatic monologue, odes, stanzaic forms

  • Tone and rhyme scheme

  • Speaker and imagery

  • Situation and setting

  • Diction and connotation

  • Allusion and personification

  • Drama: reading, responding, writing, Soliloquy Aside Dramatic Irony

 

SECTION 2: Course Policies, Assessments, Grading

Attendance:

Students are required to attend all class sessions for the full duration of each such instructional session. Grade penalties for absences will be imposed when a student exceeds a ten-percent absence rate (in the case of 15-week English 102 courses, starting with the third absence). The policy can be accessed at http://rcbc.edu/files/PDFFiles/Human%20Resources/board-policies/Policy%20No%20206%20Academic%20Attendance%20Policy%20061714.pdf. Student attendance is important. Students are expected to attend every session unless there is a legitimate reason for them missing class. Failure to regularly attend a class a class like this like this will greatly impede student success. Your grades will be determined by your writing primarily, but attendance and what you contribute to the course are crucial. If you do not attend class or contribute actively, you are unlikely to comprehend the course material well enough to pass the course. Leaving early, without prior permission, is considered disrespectful and will not be tolerated. I will not tolerate frequent lateness. If this is a morning class and the student has difficulties staying awake or showing up on time, I would strongly suggest finding another section of this course to take. (Updated Spring 2014 by AL, SL, BL, VC With Administrative Addition Fall 2014/6)

 

COMMUNICATION:

Students are responsible for communicating with instructors within 48 hours following a missed class to make arrangements for the completion of course requirements not completed due to absence. If a student does not communicate within 48 hours as stated above, the student forfeits his or her right to receive the missed work, and such assignment grades will be entered as zeroes.

 

Academic Dishonesty/Plagiarism:

RCBC is committed to maintaining a culture of academic integrity where members are expected to adhere to fundamental values in both academic and nonacademic endeavors.  For the purpose of this code, academic integrity is defined as a commitment, even in the face of adversity, to these fundamental values: honesty, trust, fairness, respect and responsibility.  It is the belief of RCBC that these values form principles of behavior that enables academic communities to translate ideas to action. The Academic Integrity policy can be accessed at http://rcbc.edu/files/PDFFiles/Human%20Resources/board-policies/Policy%20No%20903-C%20Academic%20Integrity%20061714.pdf


Specifically, the term “plagiarism” includes, but is not limited to, the use by  paraphrase  or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work or sections of a work of another person without full and clear acknowledgement, whether intentional or not.  This includes any material copied directly or paraphrased from the internet.  Plagiarism also constitutes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of a term papers or other academic materials, including material taken from or ordered through the Internet. For more information on academic dishonesty/plagiarism see Board Policy #903-C.

 

Assessment Methods:

Assignment Design Project 20%

Citation Practice 5%

Course Contribution 10%

End of Semester Reflective Essay 10%

In Class Research 10%

Midterm Paper 20%

Professional Email Assignment 5%

Term Paper 20%

=100%

There Is No Extra Credit

 

Criteria for meeting grade determination are as follows:

A: Meeting course goals by demonstrating perceptive understanding of readings and course concepts; excellence and originality in compositions; superior scores on exams and other assigned work; active participation in class discussion and small groups; and compliance with attendance and assignment requirements.

B+/B: Meeting course goals by demonstrating mastery of subject and concepts; above average quality in compositions and exams; good participation in class and small groups; and compliance with attendance and assignment requirements.

C+/C: Meeting course goals by demonstrating a satisfactory level of understanding of subject material and concepts; acceptable quality in compositions and exams; adequate participation in class and small groups; and compliance with attendance and assignment requirements.

D: Not meeting all of the course goals; minimal knowledge of subject material and concepts; marginal quality in compositions (poor quality of development, support, or grammar); poor performance on exams; passivity in class and small groups; non-compliance with attendance and assignment requirements.

F: Not meeting course goals; unsatisfactory progress in understanding and applying subject material and concepts; incomplete or unacceptable work in compositions (gross grammatical, developmental, and structural errors); failure of exams; non-compliance of attendance and assignment requirements.

 

SECTION 3: College Information

College Policies:

In order for students to know their rights and responsibilities, all students are expected to review and adhere to all regulations and policies as listed in the College Catalog and Handbook.  These documents can be accessed at http://www.rcbc.edu/academic-resources.   Important policies and regulations include, but are not limited, to the following:

  • College Attendance Policy

  • Grading Standards

  • Withdraw (W) and Incomplete Grades (I & X)

  • Withdrawal date for this semester

  • Student Code of Conduct

  • Academic Dishonesty/Plagiarism and Civility

  • Use of Communication and Information Technology

 

Student Code of Conduct:

The purpose of this Code of Conduct is to protect Rowan College at Burlington County, its academic and social community, and its property from harm resulting from acts of its students causing injury thereto, or threat of injury.  To this end, this Code defines prohibited conduct and provides for imposition of appropriate discipline upon those students whose acts are in violation of its standards of conduct, by means of hearing procedures affording both prompt disciplinary determinations and appropriate due process to the alleged violator. Students at Rowan College at Burlington County may be accountable to the civil authorities, as well as to the college, for acts which constitute violations of law as well as violations of this Code. In such event, college disciplinary actions will proceed notwithstanding the pendency of any criminal, drug or disorderly persons proceedings. Similarly, dismissal or acquittal of such concurrent legal proceedings will not necessarily result in dismissal of college disciplinary actions.  The college recognizes that its inherent powers and responsibilities to act so as to protect the safety and well-being of the campus community are broad, and that the potential range of student misconduct which could harm persons and property on campus is also broad. Accordingly, these regulations are to be interpreted broadly so as to effectuate to the fullest extent the protection of the Rowan College at Burlington County community. These written regulations are intended to define prohibited offenses with precision so as to give students notice of the behavioral standards expected of them and of the consequences should violations to the Code occur. They are not meant to define misconduct in exhaustive terms. For additional information on this policy refer to http://rcbc.edu/files/PDFFiles/publications/Catalog/RCBC1617Catalog_091316.pdf

 

Educational Technology Statement:

Rowan College at Burlington County advocates a technology-enhanced teaching and learning environment. Advanced technological tools may be used in any course section to facilitate instruction. Many of our sections are web-enhanced, which means that some of your work will be submitted or completed online. Web enhancements may include on-line materials, grade books, testing and quizzes and assignment submission.  For additional information on this policy refer to http://rcbc.edu/files/PDFFiles/publications/Catalog/RCBC1617Catalog_091316.pdf

 

Office of Student Support and Disability Services:
In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act, the Student Support Services Office’s mission is to ensure all students with disabilities are provided access to educational and extracurricular activities while on college premises through support in the form of reasonable accommodations such as adaptive technology, counseling, note-taking assistance, and American Sign Language interpreters. Students who have disabilities must self-identify, provide documentation of disability(ies), attend an intake appointment, and sign a Disability Release Form (rcbc.edu/studentsupport) prior to the start of the semester to ensure reasonable accommodations. For more information please contact the Office of Student Support at ext. 1208. For additional information on this policy refer to http://rcbc.edu/studentsupport/staff.

 

Student Success Services:
RCBC offers a variety of free services for its students including those listed below. Descriptions of these services, as well as many others, can be found in the College Catalog and Handbook and on the RCBC website at the following URLs.

 

 

Prohibited Conduct:

The following acts when committed by students of Rowan College at Burlington County shall be deemed misconduct subject to imposition of discipline under this Code. In addition to this Code, students will be held accountable to the policies on Civility on Campus, Racial/Ethnic Harassment, Sexual Harassment, Smoking on Campus, and Substance Abuse/Use on Campus. Harassment, Anti-Discrimination, Equal Opportunity, Non-Retaliation, Whistleblower and Complaint and Reporting. 1. In compliance with the State of New Jersey’s “Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights Act”, the college will maintain zero tolerance towards behavior involving harassment, intimidation, and/or bullying of any kind that is directed to students, members of the college community, and/or visitors. Harassment, intimidation and/or bullying includes but is not limited to any gesture, written, verbal or physical act, or any electronic communication that targets another individual and/or that is reasonably perceived as being motivated either by any actual or perceived characteristic, such as race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, or a mental, physical or sensory disability, or by any other Campus Information/Regulations 46 | Rowan College at Burlington County distinguishing characteristic, that takes place on or with college property or at any college sponsored function.

 

SECTION 4: Instructor Policy

Technology Policy:

Please mute your cell phone BEFORE entering the classroom. If your cell phone goes off more than once while class is in a session, you will be asked to leave. I fully encourage whatever technology suites your learning style, accommodations, or interests whether they are laptops, tablets, apps on smart phones, etc, as long as they do not distract from our purpose in the classroom. Paper is totally fine too.

With that being said, during opening and closing remarks in class focus should be away from technology and on discussing our goals and outcomes for the day. Please remove all earbuds before entering class and keep them removed until you leave the room at the end of class.

In my classes, I have an expectation students will have access to email and computers in general. All of your work will be submitted to me via your RCBC account and returned via it. Given there are public and school libraries, the ILRC, coffee shops, etc, students need to budget their time better; I do not see any excuse for having “no access” to email outside of the classroom.

Students are expected to check their RCBC Gmail account on a regular basis. I do not accept the excuse, “I didn't check my email for two weeks” as a valid problem. Digital correspondence should be written using proper grammar and form. I will not reply to emails filled with texting speak (2, u, 4, lol, j/k) or poor grammar and/or misspellings. Please include a subject and "sign" your email with your name, student ID number, and course section. If you miss class, please check the syllabus for information about assignments, due dates, and outcomes from class. Do not email the professor and ask “did we do anything in class today?” or any variations on that theme. (Updated Spring 2013 by NC, MS, MM, LG)

 

Writing Policy:

My expectation for this class is that all of your work will be free of errors. Papers, projects, etc should be proofread for spelling, mechanics, and grammar. I will mark down for these errors: Please do an exhaustive job of proofreading and revision. All papers should follow standard MLA 8 formatting: Typed; titled; double spaced; page numbers, with your last name, in the top right hand corner; and a page break before your works cited page. All papers will be digitally submitted by 23:59 to my RCBC Google Drive (wwend@rcbc.edu) on the due date. I will not be accepting print copies of your papers. All work will be returned to their school email.

If you use Microsoft Works, please convert your file (.wps) to something more accessible (.odt or .doc is fine) before submitting your paper. Same goes for .pages files. Please do not submit a .pdf file.

Upon sharing your paper, do not consider your paper submitted until, if and only if, you receive a confirmation reply (usually within 24-48 hours). If you do not receive a confirmation email, it is the student’s responsibility to get in touch with me about their work. I am not responsible for making sure you hand in your assignments.

Please make sure you are backing up your work to an external hard drive, flash drive, cloud based source, or other backup method. I will not accept excuses involving crashed computer or broken files.

Please follow the “24 hour rule” for graded work. I do not discuss returned student work until 24 hours have elapsed since I returned them. There will be no discussion, in person or via email, until that time window has elapsed.

All submitted work should be completed by the due date. Please consult the extension policy for details about asking for, and receiving, an extension. With prior permission to submit late work, a full letter grade will be taken off for each day that it is late. (Updated Spring 2015 by AB, CD, and MW)

 

Revision Policy:

I strongly believe one of the most important lessons I learned about writing was that quality work almost always entails rewriting, but also reflection on what lessons can be learned and implemented in future writing. In this class, in place of a straight paper revision, you will analyze the mistakes I noted in comments on your paper and write a response discussing the comments and how you would correct them in future writing. This means if you are not satisfied with your grade, you may submit a response (directions are below), shared to my school Google Drive (wwend@rcbc.edu), within 3-5 days after I comment on your paper.

My expectation that for every mistake you are fixing, there is a brief paragraph discussing how to correct your work. I would consider directly citing our book readings (and the writing manual from ENG101) or your notes from class discussions in this response. Please do not cite random writing from the world wide web. There should be a second paragraph discussing specifically how you would fix it in your own essay as well.

If you are unsure what to write about, you can always schedule an appointment during office hours whether in person or electronic. Regardless, I would strongly suggest meeting with me to make sure you understand your grade and how to improve it.

Anywhere between one (1) to three (3) points can be added to your paper proportionally depending on the overall point total of the paper.

     Of course, there are no revisions on term papers. Also, you may not use your revision to correct a plagiarized paper (see academic honesty policy below). Finally, revisions on your citation practice and source blend assignments do not count towards your revision. (Revised Fall 2015 by HC, DH, TC)

 

Extension Policy:

Extensions are gifts, not a right. College work involves responsibility and ownership over your individual situation. With that in mind, here are a few caveats about extensions. First, I need to know 48 hours before an assignment is due if you need an extension. This will be clearly addressed on the class schedule. To apply for an extension, we must speak in person or over email immediately. A rough draft of your paper in progress will be required to be handed in at this time. I will then determine whether to grant or deny the extension and how much time would be allotted for it. To apply for an extension beyond the 48 hour mark for reasons of hospitalization, bereavement, military service, observance of religious holidays, legal reasons (jury duty, etc), or work related issues (ie: getting called into work at the last minute), written documentation not given before the due date must be in by Saturday night after the due date. For the following reasons, extensions will not be permitted: short term illnesses and family vacations. Only one extension will be granted per semester, although an "emergency" extension can be granted under certain circumstances. (Updated Fall 2011 by LD, EP, AF)

 

Course Contribution Policy:

I have found in past semesters that "participation" isn't a sufficient means of assessing students. How do you grade shy, or otherwise quiet, students who do very well in your class? At the same time, does a student who does very poorly on papers/quizzes/etc, but "participates" in class deserve a high grade? Instead, I have switched this to an assessment of a student's contribution to the course. How do you do in group work? Are you always on task, or do you take others off task with your actions? Do you bring useful ideas and thoughts into class? Do you go beyond commentary that is intended to please me or make you look smart? Do you experiment, take chances, and offer untested commentary? Do you attend our peer review sessions to not only accentuate your own work, but also help your classmates? Are you punctual and always prepared? Do you do more than just listen to me? What about your presence in the class adds to it? These are some of the factors I will consider when assessing your class contribution grade.

 

Finally:

Students in my classes are responsible for reading and understanding these course policies. Do you have questions? 

  • Send me an email: wwend@rcbc.edu  

  • Talk to me before or after class

  • Come to my office during office hours (Laurel Hall 110)  

  • If you are a student who has progress reports for a sport, EOF, or anything else, I will only fill these out during office hours. I will not fill them out at the end or beginning of classes.  

  • The syllabus is a living document. Sometimes, things might not work and we will need to make a change. This syllabus is subject to change at all times. Any changes will be discussed in class.

  • Just a reminder that all readings should be completed before class begins.

 

Section 5: Course Schedule

Session One (Monday January 23rd)

  • Attendance Sheet

  • Discuss Syllabus

  • Introduce Our Short and Long Term Assignments

  • Discuss In Class Research and Set Up Schedule

 

Session Two (Wednesday January 25th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Research and Secondary Source Discussion For John Updike's A&P

 

For Next Week: Your Professional Email Assignment Is Due To My RCBC Account (wwend@rcbc.edu) by 2359 on Sunday evening. Your citation practice assignment to due to be shared via Google Drive to my RCBC account (wwend@rcbc.edu) by 2359 on Sunday evening. We will be discussing our first story, John Updike's A&P and Begin Doing Research For Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper.

 

Session Three (Monday January 30th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Discussion Of John Updike's A&P

 

Session Four (Wednesday February 1st)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Research and Secondary Source Discussion For Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper

 

For Next Week: We Will Discuss Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper and Begin Doing Research For Shirley Jackson's The Lottery

 

Session Five (Monday February 6th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Discussion Of Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper

 

Session Six (Wednesday February 8th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Research and Secondary Source Discussion For Shirley Jackson's The Lottery

 

For Next Week: We Will Discuss Shirley Jackson's The Lottery and Begin Doing Research For James Baldwin's Sonny's Blues

 

Session Seven (Monday February 13th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Discussion Of Shirley Jackson's The Lottery

 

Session Eight (Wednesday February 15th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Service Learning Visit

  • Research and Secondary Source Discussion For James Baldwin's Sonny's Blues

 

For Next Week: We Will Discuss James Baldwin's Sonny's Blues and Have A Built In Snow Day.

 

Session Nine (Monday February 20th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Discussion Of James Baldwin's Sonny's Blues

 

Session Ten (Wednesday February 22nd)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Snow Day....Maybe...OR...We Can Begin Discussing Our Assignment Creation Project

 

For Next Week: We Will Have Another Built In Snow Day. We Will Peer Review Our Midterm Paper.

 

Session Eleven (Monday February 27th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Snow Day....Maybe...OR...We Can Begin Discussing Our Assignment Creation Project

 

Session Twelve (Wednesday March 1st)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Peer Review For Midterm Paper

 

For Next Week: Your Midterm Paper Is Due To Be Shared To My School Account Via Google Drive (wwend@rcbc.edu) by 2359 On Sunday Evening. We Will Begin Working On Projects.

 

Session Thirteen (Monday March 6th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Project Day

 

Session Fourteen (Wednesday March 8th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Project Day

 

For Next Time: More Project Work…

 

Session Fifteen (Monday March 20th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Project Day

 

Session Sixteen (Wednesday March 22nd)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Project Day

 

For Next Week: We Will Introduce The Term Paper. We Will Begin Research For Ibsen’s A Doll House.

 

Session Seventeen (Monday March 27th)

  • Five Minute Meetings

  • Introduce Term Paper

 

Session Eighteen (Wednesday March 29th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Research and Secondary Source Discussion For Henrik Ibsen's A Doll House

 

For Next Week: We Will Discuss Ibsen’s A Doll House. We Will Begin Research For Wilson’s Fences. The Final Day To Withdraw From Fifteen (15) Week Courses Is March 31st. As A Courtesy, Up To The Moment Grade Reports Will Be Sent To Your RCBC Email.

 

Session Nineteen (Monday April 3rd)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Discussion Of Henrik Ibsen's A Doll House

 

Session Twenty (Wednesday April 5th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Research and Secondary Source Discussion For August Wilson's Fences

 

For Next Week: We Will Discuss Wilson’s Fences. We Will Begin Research For Shakespeare’s Othello.

 

Session Twenty One (Monday April 10th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Discussion of August Wilson's Fences

 

Session Twenty Two (Wednesday April 12th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Research and Secondary Source Discussion For William Shakespeare's Othello

 

For Next Week: We Will Discuss Shakespeare’s Othello. We Will Begin Research For Miller’s Death Of A Salesman.

 

Session Twenty Three (Monday April 17th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Discussion Of William Shakespeare's Othello

 

Session Twenty Four (Wednesday April 19th)

  • Attendance

  • Announcements

  • Research and Secondary Source Discussion For Arthur Miller's Death Of A Salesman

 

For Next Week: We Will Discuss Miller’s Death Of A Salesman. We Will Peer Review The Term Paper.

 

Our Last Few Classes We Will Wrap Up The Course and/or Have Classes Slid Back Because Of Additional Snow Days.

 

***During finals week we will meet on _ at _ to discuss final grades***

 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

CIN109 American Cinema Spring 2017

Rowan College at Burlington County (RCBC)
Spring/2017
Liberal Arts

Code: Cinema 109-170             Title: American Cinema                 Credits: 3

Instructor: William Patrick Wend

Meeting Days: Distance Education

Email: wwend@rcbc.edu                      Phone: 856-222-9311 #1401         Texting: 609-488-4483* 

Office Hours: Parker 413B T/TH Laurel Hall 110 W/F 1000-1100

Response Time: I am primarily in my email during office hours except for Wednesday when I do "EOffice" hours (2100-2200) on Skype. If you send an email after about 1600, there is a good chance I will not answer it until the next morning. I am rarely in my email during the weekend.

*Please let me know who you are and what class you are in somewhere in your first text.

SECTION 1: Course Information

Course Description:

This course examines how business savvy, creativity, and technical skills drive the film industry. Studio executives, directors, cinematographers, and others share their thought and experiences. Clips from over 300 movies demonstrate why movies continue to captivate audiences.


Required Texts and other Materials:

  • American Cinema by John Belton (ISBN: 978-0073535098)

  • Films For Assigned Papers

  • Additional Materials Supplied By Instructor
     

Course Learning Outcomes

By the end of Cinema 109, you should be able to:

  • Recognize and explain essential elements of film language, such as mise en scene, basic camera, lighting, and editing techniques, and cinematic uses of sound. This knowledge will provide a solid foundation for any future film appreciation or film/video production courses, or for entry –level jobs as television studios and video production houses.

  • Recognize typical narrative and visual styles of Hollywood movies from specific time periods, especially since the 1950’s.

  • Recognize and analyze characteristics of familiar Hollywood film genres, such as romantic comedy, the Western, science fiction, and film noir.

  • Recognize the interrelationship between the popularity of Hollywood genres and events in American society during specific time periods.

  • Be able to see beneath the surface story and identify deeper layers of meaning in films screened for this course, particularly as they relate to cultural, historical, or cinematic themes the instructor chooses to emphasize.

  • Write clearly, coherently and convincingly about films screened for this course. Be able to ask well-constructed questions and make intelligent comments.


General Education Outcomes:

Written and Oral Communication: Communication

  • Students will logically and persuasively support their points of view or findings.

  • Students will communicate meaningfully with a chosen audience while demonstrating critical thought.

 

Technological Competency or Information Literacy: Technology

  • Students will demonstrate competency in office productivity tools appropriate to continuing their education.

  • Students will use critical thinking skills for computer-based access, analysis, and presentation of information.

  • Students will exhibit competency in library online database tools appropriate to accessing information in reference publications, periodicals and bibliographies.

  • Students will demonstrate the skills required to find, evaluate, and apply information to solve a problem.

 

Ethical Reasoning and Action

  • Students will analyze and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different perspectives on an ethical issue or a situation.

  • Students will take a position on an ethical issue or a situation and defend it.
     

Core Course Content:

  • Mise en Scene

  • Camera and Lighting

  • Editing Sound

  • Hollywood “studio system”

  • Hollywood narrative style

  • Hollywood visual style

  • Romantic Comedy

  • The Western

  • Science Fiction/Horror

  • Film Noir

  • The Coming-of-Age Experience in Hollywood Films

  • Quest and Conquest: The American Story

  • The Outsider: the Search for American Identity

  • Ethnic Diversity in Contemporary American Films

  • The Family Experience in American Film

  • America’s New Wave of the 70’s

  • Ideology, Feminism, and Auteur theories

  • Myths and Archetypes: Hero’s Journey

 

SECTION 2: Course Policies, Assessments, Grading

Attendance:

Students are required to attend all class sessions for the full duration of each such instructional session. Grade penalties for absences will be imposed when a student exceeds a ten-percent absence rate (in the case of 15-week English 101 courses, starting with the third absence). The policy can be accessed at http://rcbc.edu/files/PDFFiles/Human%20Resources/board-policies/Policy%20No%20206%20Academic%20Attendance%20Policy%20061714.pdf.

You do not "attend" a distance learning course in the traditional manner, but there are still some concerns we need to address in regards to this issue. Despite this not being a "face to face" course, all assignments, papers, etc, need to be complete by the due dates listed on the syllabus and assignment description pages. No work is optional. There is no extra credit. You can expect to spend anywhere between six to ten hours per week reading and writing for this course. If you spend less time on this course, it will be difficult to earn a passing grade. (Updated by SB Fall 2012 With Administrative Addition Fall 2014/6)

 

COMMUNICATION:

Students are responsible for communicating with instructors within 48 hours following a missed class to make arrangements for the completion of course requirements not completed due to absence. If a student does not communicate within 48 hours as stated above, the student forfeits his or her right to receive the missed work, and such assignment grades will be entered as zeroes.

 

Academic Dishonesty/Plagiarism:

RCBC is committed to maintaining a culture of academic integrity where members are expected to adhere to fundamental values in both academic and nonacademic endeavors.  For the purpose of this code, academic integrity is defined as a commitment, even in the face of adversity, to these fundamental values: honesty, trust, fairness, respect and responsibility.  It is the belief of RCBC that these values form principles of behavior that enables academic communities to translate ideas to action. The Academic Integrity policy can be accessed at http://rcbc.edu/files/PDFFiles/Human%20Resources/board-policies/Policy%20No%20903-C%20Academic%20Integrity%20061714.pdf  Specifically, the term “plagiarism” includes, but is not limited to, the use by  paraphrase  or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work or sections of a work of another person without full and clear acknowledgement, whether intentional or not.  This includes any material copied directly or paraphrased from the internet.  Plagiarism also constitutes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of a term papers or other academic materials, including material taken from or ordered through the Internet. For more information on academic dishonesty/plagiarism see Board Policy #903-C.

 

Assessment Methods:

Citation Practice 5%

Course Contribution 10%

Discussion Forums 15%

Film Journal 20%

Professional Email Assignment 5%

Term Paper 25%

Topical Threads 15% (5% each)

 

There Is No Extra Credit

 

Criteria for meeting grade determination are as follows:

A: Meeting course goals by demonstrating perceptive understanding of readings and course concepts; excellence and originality in compositions; superior scores on exams and other assigned work; active participation in class discussion and small groups; and compliance with attendance and assignment requirements.

B+/B: Meeting course goals by demonstrating mastery of subject and concepts; above average quality in compositions and exams; good participation in class and small groups; and compliance with attendance and assignment requirements.

C+/C: Meeting course goals by demonstrating a satisfactory level of understanding of subject material and concepts; acceptable quality in compositions and exams; adequate participation in class and small groups; and compliance with attendance and assignment requirements.

D: Not meeting all of the course goals; minimal knowledge of subject material and concepts; marginal quality in compositions (poor quality of development, support, or grammar); poor performance on exams; passivity in class and small groups; non-compliance with attendance and assignment requirements.

F: Not meeting course goals; unsatisfactory progress in understanding and applying subject material and concepts; incomplete or unacceptable work in compositions (gross grammatical, developmental, and structural errors); failure of exams; non-compliance of attendance and assignment requirements.

 

SECTION 3: College Information

College Policies:

In order for students to know their rights and responsibilities, all students are expected to review and adhere to all regulations and policies as listed in the College Catalog and Handbook.  These documents can be accessed at http://www.rcbc.edu/academic-resources.   Important policies and regulations include, but are not limited, to the following:

  • College Attendance Policy

  • Grading Standards

  • Withdraw (W) and Incomplete Grades (I & X)

  • Withdrawal date for this semester

  • Student Code of Conduct

  • Academic Dishonesty/Plagiarism and Civility

  • Use of Communication and Information Technology

 

Student Code of Conduct:

The purpose of this Code of Conduct is to protect Rowan College at Burlington County, its academic and social community, and its property from harm resulting from acts of its students causing injury thereto, or threat of injury.  To this end, this Code defines prohibited conduct and provides for imposition of appropriate discipline upon those students whose acts are in violation of its standards of conduct, by means of hearing procedures affording both prompt disciplinary determinations and appropriate due process to the alleged violator. Students at Rowan College at Burlington County may be accountable to the civil authorities, as well as to the college, for acts which constitute violations of law as well as violations of this Code. In such event, college disciplinary actions will proceed notwithstanding the pendency of any criminal, drug or disorderly persons proceedings. Similarly, dismissal or acquittal of such concurrent legal proceedings will not necessarily result in dismissal of college disciplinary actions.  The college recognizes that its inherent powers and responsibilities to act so as to protect the safety and well-being of the campus community are broad, and that the potential range of student misconduct which could harm persons and property on campus is also broad. Accordingly, these regulations are to be interpreted broadly so as to effectuate to the fullest extent the protection of the Rowan College at Burlington County community. These written regulations are intended to define prohibited offenses with precision so as to give students notice of the behavioral standards expected of them and of the consequences should violations to the Code occur. They are not meant to define misconduct in exhaustive terms. For additional information on this policy refer to http://rcbc.edu/files/PDFFiles/publications/Catalog/RCBC1617Catalog_091316.pdf

 

Educational Technology Statement:

Rowan College at Burlington County advocates a technology-enhanced teaching

and learning environment. Advanced technological tools may be used in any course section to facilitate instruction. Many of our sections are web-enhanced, which means that some of your work will be submitted or completed online. Web enhancements may include on-line materials, grade books, testing and quizzes and assignment submission.  For additional information on this policy refer to http://rcbc.edu/files/PDFFiles/publications/Catalog/RCBC1617Catalog_091316.pdf

 

Office of Student Support and Disability Services:
In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act, the Student Support Services Office’s mission is to ensure all students with disabilities are provided access to educational and extracurricular activities while on college premises through support in the form of reasonable accommodations such as adaptive technology, counseling, note-taking assistance, and American Sign Language interpreters. Students who have disabilities must self-identify, provide documentation of disability(ies), attend an intake appointment, and sign a Disability Release Form (rcbc.edu/studentsupport) prior to the start of the semester to ensure reasonable accommodations. For more information please contact the Office of Student Support at ext. 1208. For additional information on this policy refer to http://rcbc.edu/studentsupport/staff.

 

Student Success Services:
RCBC offers a variety of free services for its students including those listed below. Descriptions of these services, as well as many others, can be found in the College Catalog and Handbook and on the RCBC website at the following URLs.

 

 

Prohibited Conduct:

The following acts when committed by students of Rowan College at Burlington County shall be deemed misconduct subject to imposition of discipline under this Code. In addition to this Code, students will be held accountable to the policies on Civility on Campus, Racial/Ethnic Harassment, Sexual Harassment, Smoking on Campus, and Substance Abuse/Use on Campus. Harassment, Anti-Discrimination, Equal Opportunity, Non-Retaliation, Whistleblower and Complaint and Reporting. 1. In compliance with the State of New Jersey’s “Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights Act”, the college will maintain zero tolerance towards behavior involving harassment, intimidation, and/or bullying of any kind that is directed to students, members of the college community, and/or visitors. Harassment, intimidation and/or bullying includes but is not limited to any gesture, written, verbal or physical act, or any electronic communication that targets another individual and/or that is reasonably perceived as being motivated either by any actual or perceived characteristic, such as race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, or a mental, physical or sensory disability, or by any other Campus Information/Regulations 46 | Rowan College at Burlington County distinguishing characteristic, that takes place on or with college property or at any college sponsored function.

 

SECTION 4: Instructor Policy

Electronic Literacy & Issues of Online Etiquette:

Due to this being a distance learning course, the following skill set is required: Starting and ending programs on a Windows/Macintosh/Linux computer; opening, editing, saving, storing, and backing up files; creating, sending, receiving, and reading email, including attachments; uploading and editing files onto Blackboard. You must have a Rowan College At Burlington County email account to participate in this class.

In my classes, I have an expectation students will have access to email and computers in general. All of your work will be submitted to me digitally. Given there are public and school libraries, the ILC, coffee shops, etc, students need to budget their time better; I do not see any excuse for having “no access” to email outside of the classroom.

Students are expected to check their RCBC email on a regular basis. I do not accept the excuse, “I didn't check my email for two weeks” as a valid problem. Digital correspondence should be written using proper grammar and form. I will not reply to emails filled with texting speak (2, u, 4, lol, j/k) or poor grammar and/or misspellings. Please include a subject and "sign" your email with your name and course section.

Finally, a matter of general respect: I do not tolerate homophobic, misogynistic, ableist, or racist language in the classroom. Please be respectful to your classmates, and me, on the forums.

 

Forum Journal Discussions:

Each week, there will be a series of forum discussions, instead of the journal I normally do in face to face classes, on our topics for the week. You are required to add a post with your thoughts/ideas/etc about the topic with at least 50 words and, also, reply to at least one (1) of your classmates. These discussions are worth 10% of your grade. Please do not repeat observations previously made or reply with "I agree" style sentiments. Significant points will be taken off your grade for doing this. If someone has already stated what you wished to say, find a way to expand on their statement or reply to someone else.

If I find something problematic about your discussions, I will be in touch as soon as possible.

 

Writing Policy:

I expect your work to be error free. You are expected to proofread for spelling, mechanics, and grammar. I will mark down for these errors; please revise and proofread often. All papers are to be typed, titled, double spaced, and given page numbers with your last name. All papers will be submitted digitally via Google Drive by 2359 on the due date. I will not be accepting print copies of your papers.

If you use Microsoft Works, I would like you to convert your files (.wps) to something more accessible like .doc or .odt before submitting. Also, students writing in the .pages format will need to do the same. Please see me if you need help.

It is the student’s responsibility to get in touch with me about their work. I am not responsible for making sure you hand in your assignments; it is yours. Please make sure you are backing up your work to an external hard drive, flash drive, cloud based source or other backup method. I will not accept excuses involving crashed computers or broken files.

Finally, please follow the “24 hour rule” for paper returns. I do not discuss returned student papers until 24 hours have elapsed since I returned them. There will be no discussion in person or via email about them until that time window.

 

Paper Revision Policy:

I strongly believe one of the most important lessons I learned about writing was that quality work almost always entails rewriting, but also reflection on what lessons can be learned and implemented in future writing. In this class, in place of a straight paper revision, you will analyze the mistakes I noted in comments on your paper and write a response discussing the comments and how you would correct them in future writing. This means if you are not satisfied with your grade, you may submit a response (directions are below), shared to my school Google Drive (wwend@rcbc.edu), within 3-5 days after I comment on your paper.

My expectation that for every mistake you are fixing, there is a brief paragraph discussing how to correct your work. I would consider directly citing our book readings (and the writing manual from ENG101) or your notes from class discussions in this response. Please do not cite random writing from the world wide web. There should be a second paragraph discussing specifically how you would fix it in your own essay as well.

If you are unsure what to write about, you can always schedule an appointment during office hours whether in person or electronic. Regardless, I would strongly suggest meeting with me to make sure you understand your grade and how to improve it.

Anywhere between one (1) to three (3) points can be added to your paper proportionally depending on the overall point total of the paper.

Of course, there are no revisions on term papers. Also, you may not use your revision to correct a plagiarized paper (see academic honesty policy below). Finally, revisions on your citation practice assignment do not count towards your revision. (Revised Fall 2015 by HC, DH, TC)

 

Extension Policy:

Extensions are gifts, not a right. College work involves responsibility and ownership over your individual situation. With that in mind, here are a few caveats about extensions. First, I need to know 48 hours before an assignment is due if you need an extension. This will be clearly addressed on the class schedule. To apply for an extension, we must speak in person or over email immediately. A rough draft of your paper in progress will be required to be handed in at this time. I will then determine whether to grant or deny the extension and how much time would be allotted for it. To apply for an extension beyond the 48 hour mark for reasons of hospitalization, bereavement, military service, observance of religious holidays, legal reasons (jury duty, etc), or work related issues (ie: getting called into work at the last minute), written documentation not given before the due date must be in by Saturday night after the due date. For the following reasons, extensions will not be permitted: short term illnesses and family vacations. Only one extension will be granted per semester, although an "emergency" extension can be granted under certain circumstances. (Revised Fall 2011 by LD, AF, EF)

 

Course Contribution:

I have found in past semesters that "participation" isn't a sufficient means of assessing students. How do you grade shy, or otherwise quiet, students who do very well in your class? At the same time, does a student who does very poorly on papers/quizzes/etc, but "participates" in class deserve a high grade? Instead, I have switched this to an assessment of a student's contribution to the course. How do you do in group work? Are you always on task, or do you take others off task with your actions? Do you bring useful ideas and thoughts into class? Do you go beyond commentary that is intended to please me or make you look smart? Do you experiment, take chances, and offer untested commentary? Do you attend our peer review sessions to not only accentuate your own work, but also help your classmates? Are you punctual and always prepared? Do you do more than just listen to me? What about your presence in the class adds to it? These are some of the factors I will consider when assessing your class contribution grade.

 

Finally:

Students in my classes are responsible for reading and understanding these course policies. Do you have questions?

  • Send me an email: wwend@rcbc.edu  

  • Come to my office during office hours (Laurel 110)  

  • If you are a student who has progress reports for a sport, EOF, or anything else, I will only fill these out during office hours.

  • The syllabus is a living document. Sometimes, things might not work and we will need to make a change. This syllabus is subject to change at all times. Any changes will be announced on Blackboard.  

  • Just a reminder that all readings should be completed before the due date.

 

Section 5: Course Schedule

***For Purposes Of This Course We Will Begin Each Week On Monday***

 

Week One (January 20th-22nd)

  • Complete Professional Email Assignment

  • Introduce Course

  • Introduce Yourself On The Forum

  • Introduce Citation Practice Assignment

  • Introduce Discussion Forums

  • Introduce Film Journal

  • Introduce Term Paper

  • Introduce Topical Threads
     

Week Two (January 23rd-29th)

  • Read/discuss chapters one and two in American Cinema

  • Complete Citation Practice Paper
     

Week Three (January 30th-February 5th)

  • Read/discuss chapters three and four


Week Four (February 6th-12th)

  • First two Topical Threads

  • Read/discuss chapter five

 

Week Five (February 13th-19th)

  • Read/discuss chapter six
     

Week Six (February 20th-February 26th)

  • Read/discuss chapter seven

  • Second batch of Topical Threads
     

Week Seven (February 27th-March 5th)

  • Read/discuss chapter eight
     

Week Eight (March 20th-26th)

  • Read/Discuss Chapter Nine

  • Final Batch of Topical Threads

 

We are on spring break from March 13th to March 19th. By 2359 on the 19th your first five (5) film journal entries and forum posts for chapters one (1)-nine (9) are due. The forums will be closing and no late work will be accepted. Once These Are Graded, As A Courtesy, Up To The Moment Grade Reports Will Be Sent To Your RCBC Email.

 

Week Nine (March 27th-April 2nd)

  • Read/Discuss Chapter Ten and Chapter Eleven

 

Week Ten (April 3rd-April 9th)

  • Read/Discuss Chapter Twelve

 

Week Eleven (April 10th-April 16th)

  • Read/Discuss Chapter Thirteen

 

Week Twelve (April 17th-April 23rd)

  • Read/Discuss Chapter Fourteen

 

Week Thirteen (April 24th-April 30th)

  • Read/Discuss Chapter Fifteen

 

Week Fourteen (May 1st-May 7th)

  • Read/Discuss Chapter Sixteen and Seventeen

 

Remember: Your term paper is due to my school account via Google Drive (wwend@rcbc.edu) by 2359 on Sunday May 7th. Your forum posts for chapters ten (10) to seventeen (17) are also due. The forum will be closing and no late work will be accepted.

 

 

CIN109-170 Spring 2017 Syllabus by William Patrick Wend is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.