Willow's Not Just Sexual, She's Sexually Deviant

David Kociemba’s essay in the most recent issue of Slayage tackles the alternate reality created in the season three episode The Wish.  Kociemba uses the less than ideal reality of syndication as an example of why most shows do not do episodes like The Wish:

[2] Most television series, however, do not teach these pleasures. The economic incentives inherent to syndication make it more profitable for producers and distributors to foster narrative stasis and nostalgia. As Margaret L. Carter observes, most mainstream television narratives presume the stability of the primary world, the “real” world we live in (Carter 177).

The most interesting part of the essay however is the discussion of the “wishverse” version of Willow Rosenberg.  Willow, who has become a very powerful vampire in the wishverse, is compared to Drusilla:

For Carter, Willow’s become a modern Drusilla (Carter 181). There are some similarities. Both like to play the little girl saddened by the mean father, mostly as a means of getting their way. Both are performers, whether it is displayed through Willow’s smiles as she watches Xander watching her play with the puppy or Drusilla’s attention-getting visions. (The morning paper sometimes inspires Drusilla’s visions, but they’re also genuine at times.) The difference between Vamp Willow and Drusilla is in the historical era of these naughty little girls. Drusilla’s a Victorian’s notion of a bad girl, seeing what she oughtn’t, speaking uncomfortable truths, and dreaming, always dreaming, things she shouldn’t…Willow’s bad girl is modern because it’s aggressively sexual in a way that it would probably not even occur to a Victorian woman in any direct manner. Willow’s not just sexual. She’s sexually deviant, a dominatrix whose victims have no safety word.